I’ve uploaded my photos from the Hack-A-Way to a gallery on my site and (more importantly) the Evergreen community Flickr account.  See them along with somewhat lame commentary here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/evergreen-ils/

You’ll notice in the photos a lot of people quietly typing.  There was discussion but the nature of a hackfest is a lot of collaboration and coding.  And this hackfest had coding, tutorials, documentation and more.  Indeed, many people came in with things to talk about, things to resolves, things to learn and things to work on together.  It was great.  One person said they wished we could do this several more times a year.  That’s probably not practical but the fact that it gave that feeling of being useful made me feel good.

It was a good but exhausting week.  I started with picking up materials the Saturday before and it just went on from there.  This isn’t to say that I did it all.  Other staff, at the York County Library, were critical to pulling this together and although their roles were sometimes invisible to participants, trust me when I say that everyone appreciates each of their efforts immensely.   For me it wrapped up just a few hours ago, a week later, dropping off a few colleagues at the airport and doing this blog entry.  

Several people commented on how productive it was and big progress was made on several fronts. 

http://wiki.evergreen-ils.org/doku.php?id=hack-a-way-2014

The Evergreen wiki page and linked collaborative Google Doc outline a bit of what happened.  I also tried to highlight some of the more offbeat moments on Twitter under the #egils and #hackaway14 hashtags.  Well, at least the PG rated events.  The exact language a few points may not have been copied verbatim.  I think that would have raised it to PG-13 in one or two cases.  And I do regret not getting the beat boxing on video.

We didn’t fix the entire world’s (or even all of Evergreen’s) problems but we made progress.  We looked at Evergreen issues and compared issues with specific installations.  We talked about big picture issues that affect the future of the community.  We groused, we pontificated and just shared opinions.  And we ate BBQ. 

We talk about community in open source a lot but when we talk abstractly it’s about faceless sources of email and git commits.  Events like this, even more than the conferences, bring home how human that community is.  I’m lucky in that I like these humans.  I like spending time with them and like working with them but it still makes for a very long week. 

I learned a lot of new things this year that I hope to put into practice over the next year and soon enough #hackaway15 will start it’s own planning process.