Hack-A-Way 2013 Day 2

day 2

I should have said this on the outset of yesterday's post - Hack-A-Way 2013 hosted by Calvin College and sponsored by Equinox Software.  I have no obligation to mention those in this forum but they both deserve the recognition (and far more). 

Priority one for day two was finding out how to hack hangouts so that my typing didn't mute the microphone (which they couldn't hear anyway since I was using an external microphone).  Some quick googling uncovered that this is a common complaint by people who use hangouts for collaboration and that there was a an undocumented tweak that only required minimal terminal comfort.  I'm still tempted to get a second laptop to make it easier to position the camera though and I'm definitely bringing the full tripod next time.  But, AV geekery behind me ...

We started with reports on the work the day before.  

Ben Shum reported work on mobile catalog.  That group was the largest of the working groups and had laid the ground work of saying that it should have full functionality of the TPAC and that was the goal.  The team worked on separate pieces and working on moving files into a collaborative branch on working repository.  A lot of the work is CSS copied from work done by Indiana as well as de-tabling interfaces and using DIVs.  

Our table worked on a proof of concept for a web based staff client.  Bill Erikson had previously done a dojo based patron search interface and checking out uncataloged items as a proof of concept.  We worked on fleshing that out, discussing platforms for responsive design, what would be needed for baseline functionality (patron search, checkout, see items out, renewals) and then later bills.  This is less a demo at this point than a proof of concept but one goal is to have something that might in a very limited way, with some caveats, also help those suffering from staff client memory leaks by having something that could handle checkouts without the staff client.  It is also bringing up a lot of conceptual questions about architecture of such a project.  Working directory and dev server are up.  Most of the work on this is being done by Bill and Jeff Godin with input from the rest of us.  

Lebbeous Fogle-Weekly reported for the the serials group.  They targeted some specific issues including how to handle special one off issues of an ongoing series and discussed the future direction of serials work.  In fact they already pushed some of their work to master.  However, because of their narrower focus they are going to break up 

Jason Stephenson worked on the new MARC export and has a working directory up.  New script is more configurable.  At this point I missed some of the conversation unfortunately due to some issues back home I had to deal with but apparently in a nod to Dan Scott MARC will now be MARQUE.  

In evaluating the 2.5 release process we spent a lot of time discussing the mostly good process and the big challenge the release manager had in it.  The community goal has been in making more stable releases.  During this release Dan Wells added more structure was good, the milestones, pointing out bugs was good but he also wanted feedback which was really hard for the developers who were very happy with his work.  But there are challenges and finding solutions is right now elusive.  Kathy Lussier addressed dig concerns about documentation and that ESI does a lot of the documentation work for new features but work not done by them is often left undone.  We had 380 commits since 2.4 with the biggest committers being Dan Wells, Ben Shum and Mike Rylander. Is that sustainable?  A rough guess i that those are half bugs and half features which is an improvement over the past.  Do we need to loosen review requirements?  Do we do leader boards as psychological incentive?  Concern that some would lower standards to increase numbers.  The decision about selecting a 2.6 release manager was put off as well deciding to let folks think about these issues more after we had a lot of discussion that lasted longer than we had planned.

Discussion also wandered into QA and automated testing.  A lot of progress has been made here since the conference.  In regards to unit testing there was a consensus that while it's a great idea it won't have a significant impact for a while.  Right now the tests are so minimal that they don't reflect the reality of what real data does in complex real world environments and it will take time of finding those issues and writing more tests to reflect that before the work has it's payoff.

Art.  Kinda looks like a grey alien to me.

Art.  Kinda looks like a grey alien to me.

I won't try to re-capture all of the conversation but maintaining quality and moving releases forward were discussed in great depth.  There was less interest in discussing 2.6 than really trying to clean up and make sure 2.5 is solid.  The decision about who would be the 2.6 release manager was put off and the idea proposed for a leader board to encourage bunch squashing.  A "whackin" day to targeting bugs like Koha does was also floated about.

I spent a lot of the day looking at some great instruction Yamil Saurez put together for installing OpenSRF and Evergreen on Debian for potential new users and chatting with Jeff and Lebbeous about the need for beefing up the concerto data set with new serials and UPC records.  Other projects included looking at the web site, starting a conversation about users, merchandising, IRC quotes, and so on.  

By the evening we had a nice dinner and a group of us headed out to Founders for a drink and to walk about downtown Grand Rapids in order to look at Art Prize installations which were quite nice.